23 August 2010

Dead meat

Before scrolling any further, I should warn you that the images in today's post are of dead meat. It is no big mystery where meat comes from, but still I was torn this friday as I watched ten grown men struggle to spear and barbecue a dead creature on the Greybrothers Square. On one side I was sad for the animal so brutally split open and humiliated in the afterlife, while on the other side my mouth was watering at the thought of barbecued meat. It is not the first time I have found myself in this dilemma, and as long as I continue to both love and eat animals, it is probably not the last. The project was an overnighter, and 2 chefs were assigned to the nightshift. Lunch was served at noon the next day, but as it turned out I missed that (along with that parade), and by early evening there was no traces left of the feast.

Oh that poor, yummy animal...








It is odd, but I somehow feel that it serves me right to be confronted with this sight once in a while. If I can't at least look at it, I should not be allowed to eat it.

11 comments:

  1. im just curious, what event this was a part of?

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  2. Hi Lauren, that is such a good question. I assumed it was just a random barbecue at the Peder Oxe restaurant, but now that you made me research (ha, thank you for that), it turns out it was part of the Copenhagen Cooking that is going on at the moment. Here is a link to that one event: http://www.copenhagencooking.dk/?p=1759&lang=en

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  3. Ah very cool! I live right in this neighborhood, but missed this. I've had a look at this Copenhagen Cooking and I hope that I'll get a chance to check out some of the events. It looks really interesting. And by the way, I like the point you make at the end of your post - if you can't look at it, you shouldn't be able to eat it. So spot on.

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  4. Oh boy.Here I go. This is a can of worms, or should I say a hot potato? I think you should have included a photo of a calf in this post. Lately, well after my daughter became a vegetarian at the age of 8 (she's now 14), I've come to believe that 'meat is murder'.It's taken me a long time and a lot of soul searching to reach this belief and I'm not going to be a dictator about it. It's just my opinion, afterall. (in my job as a sailor, I am regularly involved in the transport of sheep and cattle across Bass Strait. It's an awful, brutal industry) and that's enough from me, banging my drum. regards,Ian ,Melbourne.

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  5. Hi Lauren,
    I have also yet to dive into the Copenhagen Cooking events. My best chance is probably to stumble upon one, because I don’t see standing in line for steep tickets in my future. Even though I love good food.

    Hi Ian,
    It is good to hear from you again. As I was saying I am torn about the subject. I do try to educate myself on the background of the animals I eat. Whenever possible, I make sure the meat comes from small farms, with a policy of treating their animals well. That goes for eggs too, no tortured chickens on my behalf. But I am aware of the irony, and there is no denying that meat is murder. Had there been a live calf around that day, I would have got you a picture of it. And I probably would not have been itching for a steak in quite the same way. Thank you for taking the time to bang your drum. :-) Sandra

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  6. i learned that french are known for not being sensitive to animal deaths. this is true and not true as any generalization. dead meat that you eat does nothing to me (even if i don't feel the need to eat meat often). dead meat that you wear is another story.

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  7. Hi Carole, the leather used in the clothing industry comes from the same animal that is eaten. In my work (I'll do a post on that sometime soon) I use small pieces of leather, just like I eat meat on occasion. In Denmark it is only very rarely somebody feels offended by either. Some are vegetarians, some eat only fish and so on, but we tend to get along anyway. What I think is important is that the animals that are bred have a decent life, and death as well.

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  8. I'm not a vegetarian, but this looks brutal. On the other hand... that's what it is.

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  9. Hi Sabine, it does look brutal. And since I made this post and had the different comments, I have been thinking a lot about it. It has been good for me to see the animal in the original shape, in a hard way.

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  10. yeaaaah, i was not thinking of leather, of course i love leather. (well i should not say it too loud here in america, some people can get really upset), i was thinking about fur. and of course it depends on the fur, but i can't stand wild animals furs.

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  11. I think, and hope I am right, that the use of wild animal fur is over by now. As I understand it the biggest threat to wildlife is the "alternative medicine" industry. You know, horns and bodyparts from rhinos and such, terrible! They kill the animal (and endangered species at that) to get a small part, like when they chop off the shark fin (for a bloody soup, please!), and leaves the helpless animal to die on the bottom of the ocean. That is one meal I would never like to taste, sharkfin soup.

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