17 August 2010

Going Dutch

August is traditionally when the summer kicks in, just when the kids are back in school, and the official summer holiday is over. On all the August fashion fairs I can remember, people have been clinging to fans and leaflets for relief, because it was so hot. But this? Last time Denmark got this wet was back in 1930. And the joke, if there is one, is that the meteorologists never saw it coming. Not that it would have done me any good with a forewarning, nothing could have prepared me for a summer this short.

But in the spirit of rolling with the punches (while still spitting my teeth out), I will go ahead and focus on the bright side of fall. One of them hit my inbox this morning with the dates for the upcoming Dutch book market in the church Helligåndskirken. All the books cost the same, every day the price go down a notch, and on the last few days they are so cheap that they are practically free. There are books on every subject, large, small, illustrated, and even vinyl's, magazines and posters, and up until about 5 days before it ends, it is being refilled on a daily basis. One of my favourite parts is that it is open on sundays, not much in Copenhagen is.

Last time around I found this publication from 1967, with a story on the fashion stores in Copenhagen. I can't believe how cool they looked back then, and at the same time wonder why stores today all look the same?

De blomstrende tegn 1967


Two girls and a red bench 1967



Store window in Copenhagen 1967


Storefront with matching car 1967


Copenhagen fashion store interior 1967


The Dutch book market is on from August 25th to September 19th, prices start at dkr 80 per book, ending at dkr 5.

Photocredit: Pictures of pictures by Bent Raj.

10 comments:

  1. The weather is weird this year, but I guess this is just the beginning...
    These pictures are so cool. But hey, 1967 - my birth year - everything was swinging then!
    I found some very cool old photography magazines from the 70s in Italy, which I still want to feature on my blog.

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  2. Oh, Italy in the 70s, I would love to se that. I hope you will have an easier time than me getting the images out there, phew, hard work, pleading and lots of swearwords to make this post happen, haha.

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  3. Wauw - den bog ser fantastisk ud! Kan vi ikke spole tiden tilbage til dengang.... :-)

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  4. Ha, hvor sjovt, jeg tænkte på dine bøjler da jeg så det sidste billede. Og så kom jeg straks til at drømme om et hengemt lokale et sted hvor alle de ting stadig står (og venter på mig, haha). Tænk hvis de findes endnu?

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  5. Jeg ville dø for de figurer på sidste billed, det er Biba, når det er allerbedst - lad jagten gå ind!

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  6. Hahaha, jeg har dem også i kroppen. De findes derude...

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  7. Everything DID look Cool back then. Maybe I´ll bump into you at the book sale.

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  8. hi Bert, that would be fun.

    PS! Your comment showed twice, so I shaved one off :-)

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  9. oh wow this is just fantastic. i must say i really hate the standardization that is happening is every city of the world. how many gaps and h&m does one need? and it's happening everywhere while real shops with a soul are disappearing or getting so expensive, no one can afford what they have.

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  10. hi Carole, you are so right! It is scary when you in any city in the world have the same shops looking the same, side by side in nearly the same order, as you do at home. I think that standing out and providing adventure and something different in each shop is the key to fighting the all consuming internet shops (which I also love).

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