04 June 2011

The silent treatment

During the black winter with over fifty swans poisoned, I was sure that it was just a matter of time before the last handful succumbed. But they miraculously survived and come spring they were nesting in the oddest places, on neatly arranged layers of trash and algae. But they still had plenty of obstacles to overcome, like idiots getting too close in boats and canoes, disrupting the peace. I even spotted a couple of "sailors" on the microscopic bird island, chopping away at a swans nest. They must not know any better. On the other hand, it doesn't take an Einstein to figure this out...

It is obvious that we need some guidelines here, but once again the City is giving us the silent treatment. The guy who rents out boats (with a brand new and expanded fleet this year), was not even aware that there were nesting birds. He of all people should at least have been advised, wouldn't you say? The real problem is that not one person is responsible for the swans (at least not this winter, when I was on the phone with everyone from the park people to the university). You get this sneaking suspicion that our national bird is merely considered a nuisance, or at best a lake-accessory. If it was up to me the information about the lake-wildlife would be available both on signs and online, and someone was in charge of keeping the birds happy, healthy and alive. How about it, Copenhagen?

With all these obstacles I was not expecting the swans to deliver, but look:

Oh, happy heart.


12 comments:

  1. Sandra, you need a few Americans to take care of this. They would go mad and protect the birds like crazy (some of them are extreme, but it works). I you can import some of the bird watchers from Central Park, soon, your swans will rule the lake :)

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  2. I wish! Just passed the lakes today, and the swans was stressing like crazy to protect their babies, trying to escape the STUPID pedal boats. There are way too many in the water, and they chase the swans (because they want to admire them, but no less stressful for the birds). Send me some crazy American bird watchers, please Carole!

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  3. It is heart-warming...

    too bad about the idiots :(

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  4. They are so sweet, my heart melts. But I fear one of the parents may have died today. My friend found a swan at this lake today, that was paralyzed and drowning slowly, and later I saw all the cygnets with only one swan. If this is the case, I think I am going to die.

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  5. If I have time I will try to find you a good group of people and interest them in your cause. Gotta do some research though :)

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  6. Oh, that would be fantastic! It would be great to hear how other cities cope with this issue. There are so few swans left, I am beginning to wonder if they should not be relocated somewhere friendly, because I am not sure they will survive here.

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  7. It's always nice to remember how persistent life is. The baby swans are beautiful :)

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  8. I know, it is like natures way of saying it will all be alright.

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  9. I am so sad if one of the parents died. They mate for life :(

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  10. Yes, I know, this is why it breaks my heart when one of them flies into the wiring over the bridge, and fall down on the street. The mate is always there to protect it. I love that in animals as well as humans.

    I checked with my friend and she saw the dying swan before I took my pictures, so hopefully they are still one big happy family. :-)

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  11. I hope so... please excuse my romantic side ;)

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  12. Oh no, no excuses necessary here, I am so with you on this one. :-)

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