12 November 2012

Troubled water

Copenhagen is gutted in part by the construction of the new metro ring. The stations are placed in fragile locations like by the old canal houses on Gammel Strand and the Marble Church. Or in densely populated neighborhoods, wearing the locals down with noise way above the legal limits. A lot of us think we would have been better off with trams, the less invasive, much cheaper option, up and running in a fraction of the time. Or: people could just get on their damn bikes, gasp.

The next stop on the metro's path of destruction is the lakes. To some the lakes are just considered vacant space. The fact that we use them without actually using them, doesn't seem to register with these people, so what better place to store the soil from the surrounding metro stations? On the Osterbro side, half of the last lake, the last one with any wildlife left, is about to be laid dry. As it will be closed for access, they have set up a temporary bridge. I first encountered it at night.

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This part will soon be a pile of soil:

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The daytime experience:

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The galvanized railing. It bothers me a little that I like it...

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...but it is irresistible.

It is the strangest feeling to see the lakes from this brand new perspective. Soon this sight will be gone, and some even speculate that it will never return. I sincerely hope that is not the case, but then I wouldn't put it past them. We will know sometime around the year 2016.

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I wonder if I will still be blogging about Copenhagen then?


14 comments:

  1. Oh, these are sad news indeed. I love the lakes. I just wonder what they are going to do with the ducks and swans that live in that last lake on the Oesterbro end?

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    1. I don't think the wildlife are a priority at all. Since the poisoning of almost all the swans, and then all the stressful paddle boats in the two lakes, this has been the last lake where they could gather in peace. On the other lakes all we have left is a handful of ducks a couple of swans and a creepy number of seagulls.

      Maybe they will return, but I almost hope they don't, because life has not been kind to them here. Hopefully they will find better places, but our lakes will be so much more dull without them.

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  2. Not everything is up for grabs (i.e. (temporary) demolition) because a metro is being built. But in this case, I feel it's worth it.

    The lakes and wild life CAN return. Considering how many people this metro will benefit, I am all for it. A tram might be more hyggelig but once this sucker is underground it will both be efficient AND allow for parks and similar to be built on top of it.

    I don't know if you will be blogging about Copenhagen in 2016. But I hope so.

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    1. Yeah, I know there are also Copenhageners who are happy with the metro. Obviously I am not one of them. There is a tendency though to shrug your shoulders and say: "oh well, that's just progress", when something like this happens. Draining lakes, chopping down inner city trees. Like there is no room to question the methods and decisions, once they are made. Even if they are not making sense. I am talking in general here, of course.

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  3. herre gud, Sandra (siger den ikke troende). Hvor er det pæne billeder.

    Anede ikke der skulle tørlægges en sø. jamen dog.

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    1. Der skal åbenbart køres 600 vognlæs jord om dagen, hele døgnet, når de går igang. Man gruer lidt for cyklisterne også.. Jeg tror at den lille cykelsti langs søerne, på den (engang så) fredelige side bliver hård belastet i de næste mange år.

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  4. So wait - they are actually going to fill the lake with muck from the big dig? How does that make any sense?

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    1. As I understand it, it is just for storage. I'm told they are going to offload 600 trucks a day, going 24/7. Not sure about the logistics of it all because a hole that size will fill up quick? Ah, it's a mess.

      (haha: muck from the big dig)

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  5. No, you got it wrong. The trucks will offload the soil to the sea in Nordhavn, this will be one of the sites where they will load it ON the trucks from the tunnels.
    And they need to dig there because there will be a trackswitch chamber and branch to Nordhavn.

    After all it is just a small portion of the lakes and they will restore it after its finished :)

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    1. I'm trying to understand this: so they will transport the soil from the tunnels to the lake, and then by track switch underground (I assume) to the sea? Or maybe from the tunnels by track switch to the lake, and from there with trucks.

      The neighbors told me there is going to be about 600 trucks going back and forth, every day, 24 hours a day. Dizzying numbers.

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    2. Ok, i will try to make it more clear :)
      When they are boring the tunnels, the excess soil has to come out at some place, the lake will be one of those places. Here it comes up to the ground and is put on the trucks and taken to the sea. Yes, 600 trucks is a lot, but this location is the closest one to the sea, so the trucks' route is shortest and therefore impact will be kept as small as possible, so that is probably why this location was chosen.

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    3. Now it is a little more clear, thank you. :-)
      For some reason it helps understanding the logistics of it all. Maybe the metro construction would not have worn me out to the same degree, if not everything else in Copenhagen is under construction at the very same time. Torvehallerne was finally done, now they are doing Nørreport Station and Israels Plads simultaneously, DONG everywhere, Scala demolished, Industriens Hus, I could go on, but I am just exhausted.

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  6. Maybe they should just truck the dirt somewhere further out of the city and make a real mountain,ie: Bispebjerg Bakke is not a bakke ;) and get some good skiing out of it!
    In some ways, a metro can be a good thing because it takes the noise/traffic and puts it underground. Also, as someone else said, you can always put green space on top of it. My first reaction to your post was "OH-NO!" but there could be some positive to it. When we built a metro here in Montreal we got a new island with a beautiful park: http://www.montreal.com/parks/jdpark.html
    Hope they are smart about it and are not making a big mistake!
    On another note, I would love to cross that bridge, especially at night!

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    1. That park looks fantastic! We already know what the outside of our metro stations are going to look like, and it is very sterile and boring. No vision and no aesthetics whatsoever. If you have been to the other metro lines in Copenhagen, you know what to expect. And, to make matters worse, they have not thought about bike parking when they made it that is something they add on in the end.

      I really feel like there is no real vision or love for Copenhagen, in the planning stages. Nope, I am just ugh about the whole thing. Still. Maybe they will surprise me in the end?

      But the bridge is a nice touch, I agree.

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