26 February 2016

Bike parking heaven

The suffering of the trees brought me to the tree (and bike-) mayor’s office, and with that I finally got my ticket to bike parking heaven: The in-house bike parking facility of City Hall, designed by Martin Nyrop and built in 1905.

There are no signs leading the way. If you have business there, you know the way, otherwise it is a well-kept secret. I located a ramp at the back of the building, and confirmed with a guard that I was on the right track. Entering City Hall with your bike. I hope they get a kick out of that every day..

I pulled my bike up the ramp, and entered a fancy, guarded reception area. Surely I was not supposed to bring my bike here? But I was. Continuing into the “parterre”, the bike parking level. Pretty sure that my bike let out a squeal.

Bike parking parterre, City Hall in Copenhagen

Employee bike parking facility at Copenhagen City Hall.

Bike parking parterre, City Hall in Copenhagen

Daylight seeping in through a matted glass ceiling, travelling five stories down. They really knew how to design with daylight back then, by the use of balconies.

Bike parking parterre, City Hall in Copenhagen

Sturdy brass-lined ramps, no banging metallic sounds here. Sounds are muffled, with acoustics like a cosy living room. Oh, how I love good acoustics.

Bike parking parterre, City Hall in Copenhagen

No bike parking against the wall. As if anyone have the heart to lean a bike against a corduroy upholstered bench?

Bike parking parterre, City Hall in Copenhagen

(major repressing of backup-camera-whining here, ugh)

Bike parking parterre, City Hall in Copenhagen

Pampering continues with polished copper faucets.

Bike parking parterre, City Hall in Copenhagen 
Adding a new word to my vocabulary: parterre. Between the basement and the ground floor.

Bike parking parterre, City Hall in Copenhagen

Looking down the in-house bike parking facility, from the ground level, not a bike in sight. Perfectly planned in 1905, you have to wonder why they didn't continue this way of thinking? Today bike parking is a mere afterthought, in Copenhagen. Even train stations are still built with insufficient bike parking space and outdated solutions. They should know better. After all, they park here every day.


8 comments:

  1. wow! excellent photos!

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    1. Thank you, Emma. I still miss my old camera, though. So much.

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  2. Gustavo Woltmann thinks that this is great blog! - Gustavo Woltmann

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    1. Sandra Høj says thank you. :D

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  3. You had me at "corduroy" ;) Wow- what a treat to see this! Hope your bike enjoyed the mingle :)

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    1. It did. I only wish my bike could be tugged away indoors at night. Sometimes when the weather is acting up, I feel like taking it into my apartment on the second floor, haha. It weighs a ton/not happening. : )

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  4. it looks fantastic Sandra! And so good they kept the space for its original purpose. In Paris it would already be a hipster place/art gallery/bar/store... even inside the city hall ;)

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    1. Really? I thought the French had such respect for history. In this case, I think they kept it around because it always filled a need. It may have been packed daily like this for a century. Just imagine the cluttered sidewalks in front of City Hall, if they had no proper employee parking?

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